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Open Horizon

Open Horizon Begins Second Mentorship Term, Looks Back on the First

By Blog, Open Horizon

Written by Joe Pearson, Open Horizon Chair of the Technical Steering Committee and Edge Computing and Technology Strategist at IBM

This spring, the open-source Open Horizon project continued working with the LFX Mentorship Program.  As part the LF Edge umbrella organization, Open Horizon had access to both the Mentorship Program and the COVID-related funding provided by both the Linux Foundation and Intel which paid stipends to participating mentees.

Similar to our previous experience last Fall, we had a wealth of potential applicants to choose from.  Thanks in large part to being featured on the LFX Mentoring home page, our applicant pool grew from 30 last term to 43 this term.  This time, the range of educational experience from candidates was even wider – from sophomores to doctoral candidates.  The wealth of experience was much greater this term, and the drive and determination was incredible.  Our methods of choosing the top candidates last time narrowed the pool from 30 to 12, but this time only took us from 43 to 30.  After conducting interviews and matching applicant experience to our mentorship opportunities, we selected the final four candidates.

Two mentors returned for the Spring term, and we added two new mentors.  Returning were:

  • David Booz (Dave) – Chief Architect and one of the project founders, Dave is also Chair of the Agent Working Group and a member over the last six years. Dave understands the complete breadth and depth of the project code.
  • Liang Wang (Los) – Senior Technical Staff Member (STSM), Architect, and Chair of the China Manufacturing Special Interest Group (SIG). Los is creating a community around manufacturing and Industry 4.0 use cases.

The two new mentors were:

Dave and Bruce decided to collaborate and provide a challenging mentorship opportunity to the mentees by providing a linked project to work on.  One mentee would collaborate with the Agent Working Group and one with the Management Hub Working Group.  Together they would add the ability to support shared secrets.  On the Agent side, Dave chose:

  • Debabrata Mandal (Deb) – Deb is a final year student at IIT Bombay in Mumbai. Deb described his current work, saying: “I am currently working on an issue … related to fetching the logging information from the specified service using the service url. While solving this issue I am getting a more detailed idea of the working of the agent component.”

Bruce wanted to work with:

  • Megha Varshney – Megha is a final year undergraduate at Indira Gandhi Delhi Technical University for Women. She is: “… currently working on [an] issue wherein I will be adding an API which would provide org specific status info.”

Los cooked up a challenge this year by adding support for the RISC-V microarchitecture to the Open Horizon project.  For that effort, he selected:

  • Quang Hiệp Mai (Mike) – Mike is in the second year of his master’s degree program at Soongsil University in South Korea. He said: “Since RISC-V is blooming in China, supporting RISC-V arch for the agent device would attract more users in China market. So first I will port some of the examples to RISC-V arch then I will help to port Anax to RISC-V”

And Ben wanted to work with a mentee to evaluate and choose an appropriate technology and subsequently to migrate pipelines to that choice.  He wanted to work with:

  • Mustafa Al-tekreeti – Mustafa is a Ph.D. educator transitioning to a career in software engineering. He explained: “I am working on developing a CI/CD pipeline for Anax, one of the Open-Horizon projects, using one of the state-of-art technologies. First, we evaluate three of the available options (Circle-CI, GitHub Actions, and Jenkins Job Builder hosted by LF Edge) and summarize their pros and cons. Then, we implement the pipeline using the chosen technology.”

We’re now three weeks into the Spring 2021 term and beginning to make plans for a potential Summer 2021 term, which would open for applicants beginning April 15th.  In the meantime, we recently recorded a webinar with the graduates from our Fall 2020 term.  It was a great opportunity to get everyone together on a call and discuss what we accomplished and learned and to provide helpful advice to future applicants.

Open Horizon Moves to Stage 2!

By Blog, LF Edge, Open Horizon

Written by Joe Pearson, Open Horizon Chair of the Technical Steering Committee and Edge Computing and Technology Strategist at IBM

On Thursday, March 4, 2021 the Open Horizon open source project was officially promoted to stage two maturity.  This was the culmination of a process that began on January 27, when I presented the proposal to the LF Edge Technical Advisory Committee (TAC).

Introduction

The Open Horizon software project was seeded by a contribution from IBM to the Linux Foundation in April 2020.  The project’s mission: to develop open-source software that manages the service software lifecycle of containerized applications on edge compute nodes.  Since that initial code contribution, the project and community has grown as it has attracted new project partners and contributors.

About Stage Two

Reaching stage two is a significant milestone for open-source software projects because it is a strong indicator of both the organization’s healthy growth, and potential stakeholder interest in using the software as a solution for specific use cases.  In the LF Edge umbrella organization, projects have to meet the following criteria to achieve stage two:

  • Past community participation met previous growth plans
  • An ongoing flow of merged code commits and other contributions
  • Documented proofs of concept using the software
  • Collaboration with other LF Edge projects
  • Growth plan, including projected feature sets and community targets

Getting Started

Since the project began last spring, it formed a Technical Steering Committee (TSC) and began hosting public meetings last July.  The TSC then authorized the creation of seven Working Groups which are responsible for overseeing the daily work of the project.  Then a Special Interest Group (SIG) proposal was presented for the formation of a group to promote manufacturing and Industry 4.0 use cases last August, which was approved.

Growing the Community

The project has also been actively involved in reaching out to students and universities.  Thanks to funding from the Linux Foundation and Intel, the LFX Mentorship program was able to provide stipends for mentees who complete a term with Linux Foundation projects.  Open Horizon joined the LFX program and was able to mentor four students and early career persons from October to December 2020.  This mentorship program continues, and Open Horizon has just begun the Spring 2021 term with four new mentees.

Using the Platform

Last year, IBM created a commercially supported distribution of Open Horizon that was named IBM Edge Application Manager (IEAM).  We’ve seen Open Horizon, or Open Horizon-based distributions, being used in an autonomous ship, vertical farming solutions, regional climate protection management, shipping ports, and even the International Space Station to deliver applications and related machine learning assets.  And last week HP Inc, Intel, and IBM presented a webinar to invite retailers and vendors to participate in creating an Open Retail Reference Architecture based on the EdgeX Foundry, Open Horizon, and SDO projects.

Creating an Open Edge Computing Framework

The LF Edge organization provides a structure to support open edge computing projects.  This should allow those projects to collectively form a framework for edge computing if they support common standards and interoperability.  The Open Horizon project is working to further that goal by both working with other LF Edge projects to create end-to-end edge computing solutions when combined, but also to support existing open standards and to create new standards where none exist today.  An example of supporting existing standards is in the area of zero-touch device provisioning where Open Horizon incorporates SDO services, a reference implementation for the FIDO IoT v1 specification.

Join Us

Now that Open Horizon has demonstrated its value as a platform and a community, it is preparing to expand the community by adding new SIGs, Partners, and contributors to the project.  To work with the project community to shape application delivery and lifecycle management within edge computing, consider attending one of the Working Group meetings, contributing code, working on standards, or even installing the software.

Additional Resources:

How do you manage applications on thousands of Linux hosts?

By Blog, Open Horizon

Written by Glen Darling, contributor to Open Horizon and Advisory Software Engineer at IBM

If they are debian/ubuntu-style distros with Docker installed, or RedHat-style distros with docker or podman installed, Open Horizon can make this easy for you. Open Horizon is an LF Edge open source project originally contributed by IBM that is designed to manage application containers on potentially very large numbers of edge machines. IBM’s commercial distribution of Open Horizon for example supports 30,000 Linux hosts from a single Management Hub!

How can this scale be achieved? On each Linux host (called a “node” in Open Horizon) a small autonomous Open Horizon Agent must be installed. Since these Agents act autonomously, this minimizes the need for connections to the central Open Horizon Management Hub and also minimizes the network traffic required. In fact, the local Agent can continue to perform many of its monitoring and management functions for your applications even when completely disconnected from the Management Hub! Also, the Management Hub never initiates communications with any Agents, so no firrewall ports need to be opened on your edge nodes. Each Agent is responsible for its own node and it reaches out to contact the Management Hub to receive new information as appropriate based on its configuration.

Open Horizon’s design also simplifies operations at scale. No longer will you need to maintain hard-coded lists of nodes and the software that’s appropriate for each of them. When a fleet of devices is diverse maintaining complex overlapping software requirements can quickly become unmanageable with even relatively small scale. Instead, Open Horizon lets you specify your intent in “policies”, and then the Agents, in collaboration with the Agreement Robots (AgBots for short) in the Management Hub will work to achieve your intent across your whole fleet. You can specify policies for individual nodes, and/or policies for your services (collections of one or more containers deployed as a unit), and/or policies to govern deployment of your applications. Policies also enable your large data files, like neural network models (e.g., large edge weight files) to have lifecycles independent of your service containers.

I recently presented a hands-on Open Horizon deployment example at Cisco Systems’ “DevNet 2020” developer conference. In this example I showed how to take an existing container, publish it to DockerHub, define Open Horizon artifacts to describe it as a service, and a simple deployment pattern to deploy it. The example application detects the presence or absence of a facial mask when provided an image over an HTTP REST API. Cisco developers, and most developers working with Linux machines, can use Open Horizon as I did in this example to deploy their software across small or large fleets of machines.

You can view my Cisco DevNet 2020 presentation at the link below:

Additional Resources:

Open Horizon Mentorships with LFX

By Blog, Linux Foundation News, Open Horizon

Joe Pearson, Open Horizon Chair of the Technical Steering Committee and Edge Computing and Technology Strategist at IBM

Late this summer, a representative from the Linux Foundation’s LFX Mentorship program attended the LF Edge Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) bi-weekly meeting and gave a presentation about their mentorship program.  The program potentially gives open-source projects a turn-key mentorship program with minimal work needed to get it started, which sounded great to me!  At the end of the presentation, they offered to speak to each project’s leadership teams if they would like to learn more.

The Open Horizon project eagerly accepted the offer, since we had plenty of opportunities for interesting work and few volunteers. We were told that once we began accepting applications, we would be flooded with more than enough well-qualified mentee candidates.

Easy onboarding experience

The project sign-up process was ridiculously easy. We filled out the forms and specified that we wanted to see each candidate’s CV/resume, a link to their GitHub repo, and a cover letter explaining in a single paragraph why they wanted to be a mentee of our project.

Incredible applicant pool

The applications began to come in. At first two (pretty easy to handle), then two more (great!), then four more (OK, this is quite a few). Within two weeks, we had over 15! By the end of our open application period, we had over 30 which was more than enough to handle. In fact, we ended up identifying both a primary and a secondary applicant for each open slot in our initial fall term.

Choosing our mentors

To select our project’s mentors, we looked for maintainers in our project with a natural teaching ability, approachability, maturity, and availability. We also assembled a pool of potential items for our mentees to work on. The four mentors selected were:

  • David Booz (Dave) – Chief Architect and founder of the project, Chair of the Agent Working Group, and a member of the team from the start almost six years ago. Dave understands the project code from both the macro level as well as the specific details about how the client software — the Agent — functions.
  • Liang Wang (Los) – Technology Advocate and Chair of the China Manufacturing Special Interest Group (SIG). Los is building up the SIG, overseeing translation of the project materials, and creating a community around manufacturing and industry 4.0 use cases.
  • Troy Fine – Software Engineer and Chair of the Developer Examples Working Group. Troy oversees creation and maintenance of all code and services that demonstrate all project solution functionality from the simple to the complex.
  • Joseph Pearson (Joe) – Project Chair and Chair of the Documentation Working Group. Joe ensures that people looking to use Open Horizon, develop it, extend or port it, and to build solutions with it have the information they need.

Choosing our mentees

We created a set of filtering criteria to shorten the list down to candidates who were not only qualified, but also exhibited a natural curiosity about our project, and were eager to get started. We also approximately matched the geographic location of the candidates as well as their linguistic abilities.

The mentors then interviewed those candidates on the short list over Slack, email, and Zoom or WebEx. It was not an easy task, and we wish that we could have accepted double our limit of four mentees.

For the work the mentees would be completing, the mentors identified tasks that fit the candidate’s natural abilities and strengths and yet would stretch them a bit. We also aimed for tasks that could be completed within the timeframe of the fall term.

Anukriti Jain

Dave selected Anukriti Jain as the mentee for his Working Group. Anukriti is a Computer Science Engineering student in the last year of her undergraduate program. She is based in India.

Han Gao

Los chose Han Gao as mentee. Han Gao is pursuing his doctorate in the Netherlands.  His goals are:

*  Become an effective contributor to the Open Horizon project with a deep understanding at the code level around its architecture and key policy-based management flow.

*  Contribute by translating Open Horizon technical documentation into Chinese, as well as creating new hands-on guidance for getting started with an end-to-end example.

*  Broaden his view and build insight across other LF Edge projects.

Clement NG

Troy went with Clement Ng for the Examples Working Group. Clement, like Troy, is based on the US west coast.

Edidiong Etuk

Joe tapped Edidiong Etuk to assist with the Documentation Working Group. Eddie is from Nigeria and is pursuing a degree in Computer Science.  He has natural leadership qualities and is an eager self-starter with a gift for intuition.

Lessons learned from the mentorship program

Now that we’re about 2/3 of the way through the fall term, we have gained some perspective through the benefit of hindsight.  It turns out that four mentees is just about the right number for our small project to handle.

The tasks have been adjusted to ensure that each mentee can complete the work in the allotted time without too much stress.  And several of them have already gained such a sense of belonging and ownership that they plan to continue working with the project after their mentorship term is complete.  We highly recommend that other projects take advantage of this opportunity.

For more details about Open Horizon, click here. Stay tuned here for updates about the next mentorship.

Edge Excitement! Innovation & Collaboration (Q4 2020)

By Blog, LF Edge, Open Horizon

Written by Ryan Anderson, Member and Contributor of LF Edge’s Open Horizon Project and IBM Architect in Residence, CTO Group for IBM Edge

This article originally ran on Ryan’s LinkedIN page

Rapid innovation in edge computing

It is an exciting time for the edge computing community! Since my first post April 2019, we are seeing a rapid acceleration of innovation driven by the convergence of multiple factors:

·     a convergence towards shared “mental models” in the edge solution space;

·     the increasing power of edge devices – pure CPU, as well as CPU plus GPU/VPU;

·     enormous investments in 5G infrastructures by network and communications stakeholders;

·     new collaborations across several IT/OT/IOT/Edge ecosystems;

·     increasing participation in, and support for, open source foundations such as LF Edge, by major players; and

·     widespread adoption of Kubernetes and Docker containers as a core layer of the edge.

With this convergence, innovation and accelerating adoption, Gartner’s prediction that 75% of enterprise-generated data will be created and processed at the edge, appears prescient.

Edge nodes – from datacenters to devices 

Much like “AI” and “IT” – edge computing is a broad and nebulous term that means different things to different stakeholders. In the diagram below, we consider four points of view for edge:

  1. Industrial Edge
  2. Enterprise Network Cloud Edge
  3. 5G / Telco Edge
  4. Consumer and Retail Edge
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This model illustrates a few key ideas:

·     Some edge use cases fall squarely within one quadrant – whereas others span two, or sometimes three.

·     Solution mapping will help shape architecture discussions and may inform which stakeholders should be involved in conversations.

·     Edge can mean very different things to different people; and consequently, value propositions (and ROI/KPI) will also vary dramatically.

Technology tools for next generation edge computing must be flexible enough to work across different edge quadrants and work across different types of edge nodes.

Terminology. And what is edge computing?  

At IBM our edge computing definition is “act on insights closer to where data is created.”

We define edge node generically as any edge device, edge cluster, or edge server/gateway on which computing (workload, applications, analytics) can be performed, outside of public or private cloud infrastructure, or the central IT data center.

An edge device is a special-purpose piece of equipment that also has compute capacity integrated into that device on which interesting work can be performed. An assembly machine on the factory floor, an ATM, an intelligent camera or a next-generation automobile are all examples of edge devices. It is common to find edge devices with ARM or x86 class CPUs with one or two cores, 128MB of memory, and perhaps 1 GB of local persistent storage.

Sometimes edge devices include GPUs (graphics processing unit) and VPUs (vision processing units) – optimized chips that are very good for running AI models and inferencing on edge devices.

Fixed function IOT equipment that lack general open compute are not typically considered edge nodes, but rather IOT sensors. IOT sensors often interoperate with edge devices – but are not the same thing, as we see on the left side of this diagram.

 

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An edge cluster is a general-purpose IT computer located in remote premises, such as a factory, retail store, hotel, distribution center or bank, for example – and typically used to run enterprise application workloads and shared services.

Edge nodes can also live within network facilities such as central offices, regional data-centers and hub locations operated by a network provider, or a metro facility operated by colocation provider.

An edge cluster is typically an industrial PC, or racked server, or an IT appliance.

Often, edge clusters include GPU/VPU hardware.

Tools for devices to data centers

IBM Edge Application Manager (IEAM) and Red Hat have created reference architectures and tools to manage the workload cross CPU and GPU/VPU compute resources.

Customers want simplicity. IEAM can provide simplicity with a single pane of glass to manage and orchestrate workloads from core to edge, across multiple clouds.

For edge clusters running Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP), a Kubernetes-based GPU/VPU Operators, solves the problem of needing unique operating system (OS) images between GPU and CPU nodes; instead, the GPU Operator bundles everything you need to support the GPU — the driver, container runtime, device plug-in, and monitoring with deployment by a Helm chart. Now, a single gold master image covers both CPU and GPU nodes.

Caution: Avoid fragmentation and friction with open source

This is indeed an exciting time for the edge computing community, as seen by the acceleration of innovation and emerging use case and architectures.

However, there is an area of concern as relates to fragmentation and friction in this emerging space.

Because the emerging edge market is enormous, there is a risk that some incumbents or niche players may be tempted to “go it alone,” trying to secure and defend a small corner (fragment) of a large space with a proprietary solution. If too many stakeholders do this – edge computing may fail to reach its potential.

This approach can be dangerous for companies for three reasons:

(1)  While isolated walled-garden (defensive) approach may work short term, over time isolated technology stacks may get left behind.

(2)  Customers are increasingly wary of attempts to vendor lock in and will source more flexible solutions.

(3)  Innovation is a team sport (e.g. Linux, Python).

Historically, emergent technologies can also encounter friction when key industry participants or standards organization are not working closely enough together (GSM/CDMA; VHS/Beta or HD-DVD/Blu-ray; Industrial IOT; Digital Twins).

So, what can we do to encourage collaboration?

The answer is open source.

Open source to reduce friction and increase collaboration

The IBM Edge team believes working with and through the open source community is the right approach to help edge computing evolve and reach its potential in the coming years.

IBM has a long history and strong commitment to open source. IBM was one of the earliest champions of communities like Linux, Apache, and Eclipse, pushing for open licenses, open governance, and open standards.

IBM engineers began contributing to Linux and helped to establish the Linux Foundation in 2000. In 1999, we helped to create the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) and supported the creation of the Eclipse Foundation in 2004 – providing open source developers a neutral place to collaborate and innovate in the open.

Continuing our tradition of support for open source collaboration, IBM and Red Hat are active members of Linux Foundation LF Edge;

  • LF Edge is an umbrella organization for several projects that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system.
  • By bringing together industry leaders, LF Edge will create a common framework for hardware and software standards and best practices critical to sustaining current and future generations of IoT and edge devices.
  • Fostering collaboration and innovation across the multiple industries including industrial manufacturing, cities and government, energy, transportation, retail, home and building automation, automotive, logistics and health care
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IBM is an active contributor to Open Horizon – one of the LF Edge projects – and the core of IBM Edge Application Manager; LF Edge’s Open Horizon is an open source platform for managing the service software lifecycle of containerized workloads and related machine learning assets. It enables autonomous management of applications deployed to distributed webscale fleets of edge computing nodes – clusters and devices based on Kubernetes and Docker – all from a central management hub.

Open Horizon is already working with several other LF Edge projects including EdgeX Foundry, Fledge and SDO (Secure Device Onboard)

SDO makes it easy and secure to configure edge devices and associate them with an edge management hub. Devices built with SDO can be added as an Edge Node by simply importing their associated ownership vouchers and then powering on the edge devices.

Additional Resources for Open Horizon

Open-Horizon documentation: https://open-horizon.github.io

Open-Horizon GitHub (source code): https://github.com/open-horizon

Example programs for Open-Horizon: https://github.com/open-horizon/examples

Open-Horizon Playlist on YouTube: https://bit.ly/34Xf0Ge

Onboard edge computing devices with Secure Device Onboard and Open Horizon

By Blog, Open Horizon, Secure Device Onboard

Written by Joe Pearson, Chair of the Open Horizon TSC and Technology Strategist for IBM

For many companies, setting up heterogeneous fleets of edge devices across remote sites has traditionally been a time-consuming and sometimes difficult process. At the Linux Foundation’s Open Networking & Edge Summit conference last month, IBM announced that Intel’s Secure Device Onboard (SDO) solution is now fully integrated into Open Horizon and IBM Edge Application Manager and available to developers as a tech preview.

The Intel-developed SDO enables low-touch bootstrapping of required software at device initial power-on. For the Open Horizon project, this enables the agent software to be automatically and autonomously installed and configured. SDO technology is now being incorporated into a new industry onboarding standard being developed by the FIDO Alliance.

Developers can try this out by using the all-in-one version of Open Horizon. Simply run a one-line script on a target edge compute device or VM and simulate powering-up an SDO-enabled device and its onboarding.

Both Open Horizon and SDO recently joined the LF Edge umbrella, which aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system. Thanks to IBM’s participation in the LF Edge open source community, contributors in the community are helping advance the future of open edge computing solutions.

See how SDO works

Simplifying edge device onboarding

Our team uses the term “device onboarding” to describe the initial bootstrapping process of installing and configuring required software on an edge computing device. In the case of Open Horizon, that includes connecting it to the Horizon management hub services. We have simplified the software installation process by providing a one-liner script, so that a person can install and run a development version of Open Horizon and SDO on a laptop or in a small virtual machine.

Before SDO was available, the typical installation process required a person to open a secure connection to the device (sometimes on premises), manually install all of the software pre-requisites, then install the Horizon agent, configure it, and register it with the management hub. With SDO support enabled, an administrator simply loads the voucher into the management hub when the device is purchased and then associates the configuration. When a technician powers on the device and connects it to the network, the device automatically finds the SDO services, presents the voucher, and downloads and installs the software automatically.

Integrating SDO into Open Horizon

The Open Horizon project has created a repository specifically for integrating the SDO project components into the Open Horizon management hub services and CLI. The SDO rendezvous service runs along side the management hub and provides a simple interface to bulk load import vouchers.

LF Edge and open source leadership

LF Edge continues to strive to ensure that edge computing solutions remain open. In May 2020, IBM contributed Open Horizon to LF Edge. With Intel also contributing SDO to LF Edge, this ensures that another vital component of a complete edge computing framework is also open source.

We’re excited to collaborate with Intel to expand the deployment of applications from open hybrid cloud environments down to the edge, making them accessible, secure, and scalable for the developer ecosystem and community. For more videos about Open Horizon, please visit LF Edge’s Youtube Channel or click here LF Edge Open Horizon Playlist. If you have questions or would like to chat with leaders in the project, join us on the LF Edge Slack  (#open-horizon, #open-horizon-docs, #sdo-general or #sdo-tsc).

On the “Edge” of Something Great

By Akraino, Announcement, Baetyl, Blog, EdgeX Foundry, Fledge, Home Edge, LF Edge, Open Horizon, Project EVE, Secure Device Onboard, State of the Edge

As we kick off Open Networking and Edge Summit today, we are celebrating the edge by sharing the results of our first-ever LF Edge Member Survey and insight into what our focuses are next year.

LF Edge, which will celebrate its 2nd birthday in January 2021, sent the survey to our more than 75 member companies and liaisons. The survey featured about 15 questions that collected details about open source and edge computing, how members of the LF Edge community are using edge computing and what project resources are most valuable. 

Why did you chose to participate in LF Edge?

The Results Are In

The Top 3 reasons to participate in LF Edge are market creation and adoption acceleration, collaboration with peers and industry influence. 

  • More than 71% joined LF Edge for market creation and adoption acceleration
  • More than 57% indicated they joined LF Edge for business development
  • More than 62% have either deployed products or services based on LF Edge Projects or they are planned by for later this year, next year or within the next 3-5 years

Have you deployed products or services based on LF Edge Projects?

This feedback corresponds with what we’re seeing in some of the LF Edge projects. For example, our Stage 3 Projects Akraino and EdgeX Foundry are already being deployed. Earlier this summer, Akraino launched its Release 3 (R3) that delivers a fully functional open source edge stack that enables a diversity of edge platforms across the globe. With R3, Akraino brings deployments and PoCs from a swath of global organizations including Aarna Networks, China Mobile, Equinix, Futurewei, Huawei, Intel, Juniper, Nokia, NVIDIA, Tencent, WeBank, WiPro, and more. 

Additionally, EdgeX Foundry has hit more than 7 million container downloads last month and a global ecosystem of complementary products and services that continues to increase. As a result, EdgeX Foundry is seeing more end-user case studies from big companies like Accenture, ThunderSoft and Jiangxing Intelligence

Have you gained insight into end user requirements through open collaboration?


Collaboration with peers

The edge today is a solution-specific story. Equipment and architectures are purpose-built for specific use cases, such as 5G and network function virtualization, next-generation CDNs and cloud, and streaming games. Which is why collaboration is key and more than 70% of respondents said they joined LF Edge to collaborate with peers. Here are a few activities at ONES that showcase the cross-project and members collaboration. 

Additionally, LF Edge created a LF Edge Vertical Solutions Group that is working to enable easily-customized deployments based on market/vertical requirements. In fact, we are hosting an LF Edge End User Community Event on October 1 that provides a platform for discussing the utilization of LF Edge Projects in real-world applications. The goal of these sessions is to educate the LF Edge community (both new and existing) to make sure we appropriately tailor the output of our project collaborations to meet end user needs. Learn more.

Industry Influence

More than 85% of members indicated they have gained insights into end user requirements through open collaboration. A common definition of the edge is gaining momentum. Community efforts such as LF Edge and State of the Edge’s assets, the Open Glossary of Edge Computing, and the Edge Computing Landscape are providing cohesion and unifying the industry. In fact,  LF Edge members in all nine of the projects collaborated to create an industry roadmap that is being supported by global tech giants and start-ups alike.

 

 

Where do we go from here? 

When asked, LF Edge members didn’t hold back. They want more. They want to see more of everything – cross-project collaboration, end user events and communication, use cases, open source collaboration with other liaisons. As we head into 2021, LF Edge will continue to lay the groundwork for markets like cloud native, 5G, and edge for  more open deployments and collaboration.  

 

LF Edge Demos at Open Networking & Edge Summit

By Blog, EdgeX Foundry, Event, Fledge, LF Edge, Open Horizon, Project EVE, Secure Device Onboard

Open Networking & Edge Summit, which takes place virtually on September 28-30, is co-sponsored by LF Edge, the Linux Foundation and LF Networking. With thousands expected to attend, ONES will be the epicenter of edge, networking, cloud and IoT. If you aren’t registered yet – it takes two minutes to register for US$50 – click here.

Several LF Edge members will be at the conference leading discussions about trends, presenting use cases and sharing best practices. For a list of LF Edge focuses sessions, click here and add them to your schedule. LF Edge will also host a pavilion – in partnership with our sister organization LF Networking – that will showcase demos, including the debut of two new ones that feature a collaboration between Project EVE and Fledge and Open Horizon and Secure Device Onboarding. Check out the sneak peek of the demos below:

Managing Industrial IoT Data Using LF Edge (Fledge, EVE)

Presented by Flir, Dianomic, OSIsoft, ZEDEDA and making its debut at ONES, this demo showcases the strength of Project EVE and Fledge. The demo Fledge will show how the two open source projects work together to securely manage, connect, aggregate, process, buffer and forward any sensor, machine or PLC’s data to existing OT systems and any cloud. Specifically, it will show a FLIR IR Camera video and data feeds being managed as described.

 

Real-Time Sensor Fusion for Loss Detection (EdgeX Foundry):

Presented by LF Edge members HP, Intel and IOTech, this demo showcases the strength of the Open Retail Initiative and EdgeX Foundry. Learn how different sensor devices can use LF Edge’s EdgeX Foundry open-middleware framework to optimize retail operations and detect loss at checkout. The sensor fusion is implemented using a modular approach, combining point-of-sale , computer vision, RFID and scale data into a POC for loss prevention.

This demo was featured at the National Retail Federation Show in January. More details about the demo can be found in HP’s blog and  Intel blog.

               

Low-touch automated onboarding and application delivery with Open Horizon and Secure Device Onboard

Presented by IBM and Intel, this demo features two of the newest projects accepted into the LF Edge ecosystem – Secure Device Onboard was announced in July while Open Horizon was announced in April.

An OEM or ODM can generate a voucher with SDO utilities that is tied to a specific device. Upon purchase, they can send the voucher to the purchaser. With LF Edge’s Open Horizon Secure Device Onboard integration, an administrator can load the voucher into Open Horizon and pre-register the device. Once the device is powered on and connected to the network, it will automatically authenticate, download and install the Open Horizon agent, and begin negotiation to receive and run relevant workloads.

For more information about ONES, visit the main website: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-networking-edge-summit-north-america/. 

LF Edge Expands Ecosystem with Open Horizon, adds Seven New Members and Reaches Critical Deployment Milestones

By Akraino Edge Stack, Announcement, Baetyl, EdgeX Foundry, Fledge, Home Edge, LF Edge, Open Horizon, Project EVE, State of the Edge

  • Open Horizon, an application and metadata delivery platform, is now part of LF Edge as a Stage 1 (At-Large) Project.
  • New members bring R&D expertise in Telco, Enterprise and Cloud Edge Infrastructure.
  • EdgeX Foundry hits 4.3 million downloads and Akraino R2 delivers 14 validated deployment-ready blueprints.
  • Fledge shares a race car use case optimizing car and driver operations using Google Cloud, Machine Learning and state-of-the-art digital twins and simulators.

SAN FRANCISCO – April 30, 2020 –  LF Edge, an umbrella organization under The Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for edge computing independent of hardware, silicon, cloud, or operating system, today announced continued project momentum with the addition a new project and several technical milestones for EdgeX Foundry, Akraino Edge Stack and Fledge. Additionally, the project welcomes seven new members including CloudBrink, Federated Wireless, Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI), Kaloom, Ori Industries, Tensor Networks and VoerEir to its ecosystem.

Open Horizon, an existing project contributed by IBM, is a platform for managing the service software lifecycle of containerized workloads and related machine learning assets. It enables autonomous management of applications deployed to distributed webscale fleets of edge computing nodes and devices without requiring on-premise administrators.

Edge computing brings computation and data storage closer to where data is created by people, places, and things. Open Horizon simplifies the job of getting the right applications and machine learning onto the right compute devices, and keeps those applications running and updated. It also enables the autonomous management of more than 10,000 edge devices simultaneously – that’s 20 times as many endpoints as in traditional solutions.

“We are thrilled to welcome Open Horizon and new members to the LF Edge ecosystem,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation. “These additions complement our deployment ready LF Edge open source projects and our growing global ecosystem.”

“LF Edge is bringing together some of the most significant open source efforts in the industry, said Todd Moore, IBM VP Open Technology, “We are excited to contribute the Open Horizon project as this will expand the work with the other projects and companies to create shared approaches, open standards, and common interfaces and APIs.”

Open Horizon joins LF Edge’s other projects including: Akraino Edge Stack, Baetyl,  EdgeX Foundry, Fledge, Home Edge, Project EVE and State of the Edge. These projects support emerging edge applications across areas such as non-traditional video and connected things that require lower latency, and  faster processing and mobility. By forming a software stack that brings the best of cloud, enterprise and telecom, LF Edge helps to unify a fragmented edge market around a common, open vision for the future of the industry.

Since its launch last year, LF Edge projects have met significant milestones including:

  • EdgeX Foundry has hit 4.3 million docker downloads.
  • Akraino Edge Stack (Release 2) has 14 specific Blueprints that have all tested and validated on hardware labs and can be deployed immediately in various industries including Connected Vehicle, AR/VR, Integrated Cloud Native NFV, Network Cloud and Tungsten Fabric and SDN-Enabled Broadband Access.
  • Fledge shares a race car use case optimizing car and driver operations using Google Cloud, Machine Learning and state-of-the-art digital twins and simulators.
  • State of the Edge merged under LF Edge earlier this month and will continue to pave the path as the industry’s first open research program on edge computing. Under the umbrella, State of the Edge will continue its assets including State of the Edge Reports, Open Glossary of Edge Computing and the Edge Computing Landscape.

Support from the Expanding LF Edge Ecosystem

Federated Wireless:

“LF Edge has become a critical point of collaboration for network and enterprise edge innovators in this new cloud-driven IT landscape,” said Kurt Schaubach, CTO, Federated Wireless. “We joined the LF Edge to apply our connectivity and spectrum expertise to helping define the State of the Edge, and are energized by the opportunity to contribute to the establishment of next generation edge compute for the myriad of low latency applications that will soon be part of private 5G networks.”

Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI):

“ITRI is one of the world’s leading technology R&D institutions aiming to innovate a better future for society. Founded in 1973, ITRI has played a vital role in transforming Taiwan’s industries from labor-intensive into innovation-driven. We focus on the fields of Smart Living, Quality Health, and Sustainable Environment. Over the years, we also added a focus on 5G, AI, and Edge Computing related research and development. We joined LF Edge to leverage its leadership in these areas and to collaborate with the more than 75 member companies on projects like Akraino Edge Stack.”

Kaloom:

“Kaloom is pleased to join LF Edge to collaborate with the community on developing open, cloud-native networking, management and orchestration for edge deployments” said Suresh Krishnan, chief technology officer, Kaloom.  “We are working on an unified edge solution in order to optimize the use of resources while meeting the exacting performance, space and energy efficiency needs that are posed by edge deployments. We look forward to contributing our expertise in this space and to collaborating with the other members in LF Edge in accelerating the adoption of open source software, hardware and standards that speed up innovation and reduce TCO.”

Ori Industries:

“At Ori, we are fundamentally changing how software interacts with the distributed hardware on mobile operator networks.” said Mahdi Yahya, Founder and CEO, Ori Industries. “We also know that developers can’t provision, deploy and run applications seamlessly on telco infrastructure. We’re looking forward to working closely with the LF Edge community and the wider open-source ecosystem this year, as we turn our attention to developers and opening up access to the distributed, telco edge.”

Tensor Networks:

“Tensor Networks believes in and supports open source. Having an arena free from the risks of IP Infringement to collaborate and develop value which can be accessible to more people and organizations is essential to our efforts. Tensor runs its organization, and develops products on top of Linux.  The visions of LF Edge, where networks and latency are part of open software based service composition and delivery, align with our vision of open, fast, smart, secure, connected, and customer driven opportunities across all industry boundaries.” – Bill Walker, Chief Technology Officer.

VoerEir:

“In our extensive work with industry leaders for NFVI/VIM test and benchmarking,  a need to standardize infrastructure KPIs in Edge computing has gradually become more important,” said Arif  Khan, Co-Founder of VoerEir AB. “This need has made it essential for us to join LF Edge and to initiate the new Feature Project “Kontour” under the Akraino umbrella. We are excited to collaborate with various industry leaders to define, standardize  and measure Edge KPIs.”

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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