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EdgeX Foundry

Edge Computing at IoT Solutions World Congress 2019

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry, Home Edge, Project EVE

Every year one of the world’s largest Internet of Things trade shows, IoT Solutions World Congress, is held in Barcelona, Spain. It brings together device manufacturers, service providers, AI & ML companies and solutions integrators from around the world to share information about their products and the state of IoT ecosystems. Filling multiple convention halls at the Fira Barcelona center, and featuring the biggest names in IoT and technology, you can spend days walking the expo hall and talking to vendors.

Crowd at the LF Edge Booth

This wasn’t the first time the EdgeX Foundry has had a booth at IOTSWC, but this year they were joined by other LF Edge projects, specifically Home Edge and Project EVE, to present solutions across the edge landscape. Our booth was staffed by project contributors from all over the world, from the US and Europe to India and Taiwan, and featured real world examples of the open source technology that is being developed under the LF Edge umbrella.  Not only did our members get a chance to learn about each other’s projects during this time, they were able to explain those other projects to the visitors to our booth. It was truly a community coming together to support and promote the LF Edge as a whole.

EdgeX Smart Building Demo EVE deployments on a wind turbine

We spoke with thousands of people over the 3 days of conference, and gave countless demonstrations. One notable change in conversations from a year ago is that most attendees we spoke to this year already knew and understood the importance of edge computing, and were looking for specific solutions to the problems that they are now facing. And while many vendors at the show offered some of these solutions, only the LF Edge projects offered open, vendor agnostic platforms that prevent lock-in and promote an ecosystem of 3rd party development around commonly developed core.

Selfie of the LF Edge booth staffIf you missed us at IOTSWC, you can join our projects online where we have a public Slack, mailing lists and host our meetings in the open. You can also look for us at events in 2020!

EdgeX Foundry Reaches 1 Million + Platform Container Downloads, Launches New Fuji Release

By | Announcement, EdgeX Foundry

  • EdgeX’s fifth release offers more scalable solutions to move data from devices to cloud, enterprise and on-premises applications
  • The first LF Edge project to achieve Stage 3 ratification, EdgeX hits widespread adoption and production-level maturity
  • EdgeX and LF Edge onsite at IoT Solutions World Congress with demos from Dell Technologies, Home Edge, IOTech and Project EVE

BARCELONA, SPAIN and SAN FRANCISCOOctober 28, 2019EdgeX Foundry, a project under the LF Edge umbrella organization within the Linux Foundation that aims to establish an open, interoperable framework for IoT edge computing independent of connectivity protocol, hardware, operating system, applications or cloud, today announced the availability of its “Fuji” release. This release offers additional security and testing features on top of the production-ready “Edinburgh” release launched this spring.

“EdgeX Foundry has experienced significant momentum in developing an open IoT platform for edge-related applications and shows no signs of slowing down,” said Arpit Joshipura, general manager, Networking, Edge and IoT, the Linux Foundation. “As the only Stage 3 project under LF Edge, EdgeX Foundry is a clear example of how open collaboration is the key to an active community dedicated to creating an interoperable open source framework across IoT, Enterprise, Cloud and Telco Edge.”

Launched in April 2017, and now part of the LF Edge umbrella, EdgeX Foundry is an open source, loosely-coupled microservices framework that provides the choice to plug and play from a growing ecosystem of available third-party offerings or to augment proprietary innovations. With a focus on the IoT Edge, EdgeX simplifies the process to design, develop and deploy solutions across industrial, enterprise, and consumer applications. As a Stage 3 project under LF Edge, EdgeX is a self-sustaining cycle of development, maintenance, and long-term support. As an example of the rapidly accelerating use of the code, EdgeX hit a milestone of 1 million platform container downloads, which almost half of these took place in the last few months.

“The 1M container download isn’t our only milestone,” said Keith Steele, EdgeX Foundry chair of the Technical Steering Committee and LF Edge Governing Board member. “The development team has expanded with more than 150 active contributors globally and the partner ecosystem of complementary products and services continues to increase. As a result, we’re seeing more end-user case studies that range from energy and utilities, building automation, industrial process control and factory automation, smart cities, retail stores and distribution and health monitoring.”

The Fuji Release

As the fifth release in the EdgeX Foundry roadmap,  Fuji offers significant enhancements to the Edinburgh 1.0 release, which launched in July, including:

  • New and improved security features to include PKI infrastructure for token/key generation.
  • Application services that now offer full replacement capability to the older export services provided with previous EdgeX releases. These application services offer more scalable and easier to use solutions to get data from the EdgeX framework to cloud, enterprise and on-premises applications.
  • Example application services are provided with this release to allow users to quickly move data from EdgeX to the Azure and AWS IoT platforms.
  • A new applications function Software Development Kit (SDK) also provides the EdgeX user community with the ability to create new and customized solutions on top of EdgeX – for example, allowing EdgeX to move edge data to legacy and non-standard environments.
  • Unit test coverage is considerably increased (in some services by more than 200 percent) across EdgeX core and supporting microservices.
  • New device service connectors to BLE, BACNet, IP camera, OPC UA, GPS, and REST device services.
  • Choices for commercially-supported EdgeX device connectors are also starting to blossom with offerings for CANopen, PROFINET, Zigbee, and EtherCat available through EdgeX community members.

LF Edge on Display

Live demonstrations of EdgeX Foundry use cases will be available at the LF Edge booth (booth A151) at IoT Solutions World Congress in Barcelona, October 29-31, 2019. Dell Technologies and IOTech will also be on-site debuting new demos based on EdgeX Foundry while other featured LF Edge projects include Home Edge and Project EVE.

EdgeX Foundry leaders will present on “Leveraging EdgeX Foundry as an Open, Trusted Data Framework for Smart Meter Monitoring,” on Tuesday, October, 29 at 12:05-12:50 pm.

Additionally, LF Edge will host a workshop entitled “State of the (LF) Edge” on October 31 in Lyon, France, co-located with  Open Source Summit Europe (October 28-30).  More details are available here.

Inaugural EdgeX Open

The EdgeX Foundry community recently kicked off a series of hackathons, titled the EdgeX Open. More than 70 attendees participated in the first event on October 7- 8, 2019, in Chicago. Hosted by LF Edge and the Retail Industry Leader Association (RILA), and sponsored by Canonical, Dell Technologies, Deep Vision, HP, Intel, IOTech, IoTium and Zededa, the event featured five teams that competed in retail use case categories. More details on the event, including the winning use case from Volteo, are available in this blog post.

The next hackathon will coincide with the Geneva release, targeted for Spring 2020. It will be centered on the Manufacturing vertical and held in a location in Europe.

For more information about LF Edge and its projects, visit https://www.lfedge.org/ 

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

The Inaugural EdgeX Open Hackathon

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry

Written by Jason Shepherd, LF Edge Board Member

On October 7th and 8th, I had the pleasure of attending the inaugural EdgeX Open Hackathon in Chicago. EdgeX Foundry is focused on facilitating interoperability between devices and applications, regardless of underlying hardware, OS, and connectivity protocol. The project is ultimately about creating a de-facto standard open API that binds together a preferred mix of open source and commercial value-add.

Once EdgeX hit 1.0 status in June with the Edinburgh release, the community started planning the EdgeX Open Hackathon series for leveraging the framework in customer-valued use cases.

The inaugural EdgeX Open, hosted at the Tech Nexus coworking space in Chicago, hosted by LF Edge, EdgeX Foundry and RILA

Six teams participated in this inaugural event, representing HAVI, Intel/Intuiface, Johnson Controls, UST Global and Volteo in addition to a small independent team of registered individuals. Pre-work was allowed but a “secret ingredient” (Iron Chef-style) was introduced the day of the event to level the playing field a bit. In this case, it was a camera using Intel’s OpenVINO computer vision and image recognition model to output an object recognition algorithm to an API. Teams were able to earn extra points by integrating this technology into their solution stack.

Read on for how the hackathon went down!

Day 1:

The first day began with pitches from top sponsoring companies Dell, HP and Intel on what EdgeX Foundry means to the IoT market. Nicholas Ahrens of the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) talked about the importance of innovation in retail and then Brad Corrion of Intel walked the teams through the objectives and introduced the secret ingredient.

Brad Corrion walking through the event rules

During my pitch, I had the pleasure of announcing that the EdgeX Foundry project recently hit a million total microservice downloads since the April 2017 launch. To get a sense of the accelerating momentum, half of these downloads occurred in the past two months!

With intros completed, the developers got to work. Most of the teams brought a plethora of devices to work with including cameras, sensors, scanners and a thermal printer and many had done some pre-work. Numerous developer attendees had never used EdgeX before and all were able to get the framework running quickly. Once the set-up was completed, they started with their integration of various devices and application stacks to build out their use cases.

Teams diligently working on their solutions

The participants had their choice of one of three use cases, or an open category:

  1. Advanced loss prevention – leveraging EdgeX to correlate computer vision events with telemetry from sensors such as RFID and transaction log data from Point-of-Sale systems for improved loss prevention/theft detection
  2. Dynamic personalized retail experience – leveraging computer vision and sensor data to drive an improved in-store customer experience based on individual shopper preference
  3. Inventory management – using data from sensors and scanners (hand-held and/or drone-based) to improve inventory accuracy
  4. Open category – any retail-centric use case deemed valuable by end users

While it appeared that most of the users picked the open category, the reality is that they did variants of the three main use cases. The teams wasted no time getting to work (actually many were working during the intro pitches…) and the room was bustling all day with activity.

From top (counter clockwise): Team Havi, Team Johnson Controls, Team Skanna

The UST Global team came up with an innovative solution for highly perishable food using Augmented Reality (AR) and RFID to enable grocery store associates to point a smartphone at fresh meat and produce displays to see products that are nearing or beyond the expiration date, i.e. “How fresh is the meat?” This would benefit the grocery store in terms of streamlining how they find, sort and discount expiring food, and benefit the consumer in terms of choosing between either the freshest products or benefiting from dynamic price markdowns or food nearing the expiration date. They came prepared, complete with props including fake chicken nuggets and lamb chops, making me hungry every time I walked by their table.

The UST Global team working on their solution for “How Fresh is the Meat?”

Day one wound down with a whiskey tasting which reminded me of the face-to-face TSC meeting in Edinburgh a year prior where we also ended the first day with a whiskey tasting. I sense a theme here!  Whiskey sommelier Anthony Dina selected three boutique whiskeys from the “edges of the earth” – one from a small batch distiller in the US, one from Scotland and one from New Zealand.

Whiskey from the edges of the earth

We then had some tasty Chicago deep dish pizza, followed by the “EdgeX Open Mic” – a community music jam.  Tony Espy (Canonical) and I worked up a variety of singalongs and managed to get a handful of folks belting out Neil Diamond’s Sweet Caroline and John Denver’s Country Roads, plus he and I did some pretty decent versions of Radiohead’s High and Dry and Jeff Buckley’s “Halleluiah”… especially considering this was only the second time we’ve played together (the first being an open mic night in Edinburgh during the Fall 2018 EdgeX F2F TSC).

Tony and I belting out the jams

Several folks came up to us afterwards and talked about how they played instruments spanning guitar to saxophone. At the next EdgeX Open, we clearly need to prepare more in advance and get a full band together, or perhaps we should just serve a little more whiskey beforehand! Or, both?

Day 2:

Day two started early with the teams continuing to build out their solutions unified by the EdgeX framework. Around 11am the judges we’re introduced – Eran Harel from AppCard, Nicholas Ahrens from RILA, Juan Santos from Tavistock Group, Mark Stutzman from Area 15, and Scott Gregory from HP. The judges subsequently spent time with each team to learn about their solutions before deliberating.

Hackathon Judges

Each team was then able to formally pitch to the judges and all participants in a final presentation that walked through their solution, what ingredients they used and how EdgeX was used for integration. The judges deliberated a bit more and then we had the closing ceremony, during which the winners were announced… and… drum roll… here they are!

The Intel/Intuiface team meeting with the judges

1st Place – Team Volteo: An inventory management and loss prevention solution that used RFID sensors and networked cameras for accurate inventory management and to record door exit events by combining POS transaction data together with merchandise movement tracked by RFID sensors and cameras.

Team Volteo

2nd Place – Team Intel/Intuiface: A predictive self-service checkout assistance solution that used RFID and computer vision to trigger an alert when a customer failed to scan items within a reasonable time and/or based on OpenVINO emotion detection during customer interaction with the kiosk.

Team Intel/Intuiface

3rd Place – Team UST Global: An AR and RFID-based solution to track ultra-perishable goods in grocery stores and allow for dynamic pricing, e.g. how fresh is the meat? They developed an AR mobile app to scan food aisles and provide details on freshness, current price, etc.

Team UST Global

And this wasn’t just for bragging rights – 1st, 2nd and 3rd place winners received $5000, $2500, and $1000 in cash respectively!  As co-founders of the EdgeX Foundry project, Jim White and I had the pleasure of handing out big checks during the award ceremony, summarily checking off a to-do on my bucket list!

Congrats to Team Volteo for winning the Grand Prize!

Thanks to our sponsors!

It has been an honor for me to participate in the EdgeX community over the years and this event was no exception. Big thanks to the LF Edge and the Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) for hosting the event, and to sponsors Canonical, Deep Vision, Dell Technologies, HP, Intel, IoTium and ZEDEDA who also provided their commercial offerings for the developers to use in their solutions as well as tech support on-site. Also, a shout-out to the planning committee which included volunteers from Dell, HP, IBM, Intel and the Linux Foundation.

EdgeX Foundry community leaders helped answer questions and more during the hackathon

Looking forward

The concept behind the EdgeX Open Hackathon is for it to be a global franchise series. Other markets in discussion for future events include manufacturing, smart cities, oil and gas, utilities/energy, agriculture, healthcare and beyond.

Stay tuned for more detail on the next installment, for which we also plan to include more about the overall LF Edge value prop by pulling from other enabling projects within the umbrella, combined with sponsor content. We’re thinking manufacturing in the Spring 2020 timeframe, likely aligned with an industry event such as Hannover Messe in a nearby town in Europe.

In the meantime, download EdgeX and build something great!

 

End User Case Study: Monitoring industrial equipment using EdgeX Foundry

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry

By Jason Shepherd, LF Edge Governing Board member and IoT and Edge Computing CTO, Dell Technologies

Founded in 1996, Technotects is an IoT technology consulting firm with broad domain expertise in industrial use cases. When one of their industrial equipment OEM customers independently realized the power of the EdgeX Foundry framework, Technotects planned and executed a Proof-of-Concept (PoC) with one of their customer’s typical process skid use cases.

This blog walks through the successful PoC, including what the solution entailed and Technotects’ experience working with the EdgeX platform. We’re seeing more and more of these types of real-world applications go public in the community on the heels of the EdgeX Foundry “1.0” Edinburgh release.

The use case

The use case for the PoC is monitoring sensor and pump information from a process skid used in a variety of applications, including agricultural, flavors and fragrances, pharmaceutical, petro-chem and food/beverage industries. Technotects’ goal of the effort was to prove that the EdgeX Foundry platform, combined with commercial value-add from the ecosystem, can provide an Internet of Things (IoT) solution stack that can address the unique interoperability challenges that industrial applications present, such as a mix of connectivity protocols and near real-time I/O processing, all while giving them the freedom of choice by being decoupled from proprietary, single-vendor solutions. In turn, this would allow their customers to improve their overall solution architectures, reduce runtime royalties and accelerate their time-to-market.

EdgeX-enabled Dell gateway utilized in the Technotects PoC

Technotects’ initial interest in EdgeX Foundry was the flexibility offered by the open ecosystem and the potential of reducing excessive runtime licensing fees per deployed host node, based on the combination of a proprietary edge application framework, edge historian and both southbound and northbound connectivity. In addition, they were attracted to the ability to make build-or-buy decisions with EdgeX without being locked into any specific choice for connectivity or applications value-add services.

The PoC basics

For the PoC, Technotects leveraged a Dell Edge Gateway 3002, Photon OS and VMware Pulse IoT Center, Edge Xpert from IOTech, RedisEdge from Redis Labs, Project Iris from RSA Labs, both AWS and Azure cloud platforms (hosting Redis for data backup) and a custom-built edge management console. Refer to the figure below for a block diagram of the setup and read on for more detail on how the effort came together.

IIoT Edge Stack Block Diagram for the Technotects PoC

Solution deep dive

For the EdgeX foundation of the stack, Technotects chose to work with IOTech’s Edge Xpert offering – a commercially-supported variant of the open source code that is available from the project GitHub within the Linux Foundation. Their use of Edge Xpert enabled them to focus on the integration with their customer’s preferred value-add software components rather than dealing with the open source code. They found IOTech’s documentation to be clear and the initial installation to be quick and straightforward – benefits when using a commercial variant that has additional hardening and packaging. Of course, using a commercially-supported variant versus simply downloading the open source code is a matter of personal preference.

EdgeX is completely neutral to OS, underlying hardware, protocol and programming language, and for this PoC, Technotects chose to leverage the Dell Edge Gateway 3002 and both Ubuntu from Canonical and Photon OS. Photon OS is an open source, container-optimized Linux distribution that has been nested within VMware’s vSphere offering for some time. Technotects was able to run their console, communication drivers, Edge Xpert and all the other referenced value-add software components in Docker containers in both operating systems, all without issue. They find that having the flexibility to deploy on any combination of hardware (x86 or ARM) and operating systems (Linux or Windows) in the field depending on customer need is valuable.

For southbound connectivity, Technotects leveraged a hybrid model. The process skids leverage a programmable logic controller for process control and for this PoC, Technotects used a commercially available Ethernet/IP driver to communicate with it. In turn, they connected this off-the-shelf, licensed driver package into the OPC-UA Device Service native to EdgeX. To connect to other devices on the skid, Technotects used the Modbus TCP protocol from IOTech’s Edge Xpert offer, written using the native EdgeX Device Service SDK. With the plug-in Device Service model, any combination of devices and protocols can be readily added in the future as needs evolve.

The solution architecture is a great example of both 1) how existing connectivity stacks can be used alongside native EdgeX Device Services in a hybrid model and 2) that in the EdgeX model, even connectivity written with the open EdgeX Device Service SDK can be monetized. Commercially-supported variants of EdgeX Device Services are likely to be attractive to end users with mission-critical use cases that involve bespoke and/or proprietary protocols in that support for this southbound connectivity often requires institutional knowledge gleaned from reverse engineering.

Meanwhile, end users can benefit from a growing number of open source Device Service options available within the community and increasingly Device Services that are supported by sensor makers for greenfield applications, coming with the sensor just like a keyboard comes with a driver for a PC. (Side note: There are numerous additional opportunities in development in the EdgeX ecosystem, although I must be sensitive to NDAs until they’re made publicly available). Net-net, the value of the open, vendor-neutral EdgeX ecosystem is in providing developers and end users with choices based on whatever is most valuable for their business.

Technotects leveraged VMware’s Pulse IoT Center to manage and monitor the underlying gateway hardware, OS and the EdgeX application framework above. VMware Pulse is a massively scalable, platform and application-independent solution for onboarding, managing, securing and monitoring IoT devices and gateways. System update campaigns can be applied in bulk and admins are alerted to any issues with their devices deployed out in the field, all in real-time. While VMware Pulse can be used standalone with its embedded device agent, it’s especially powerful when used in concert with the EdgeX framework. Any preferred console to manage applications and the underlying host system can be used with the EdgeX framework, with application-level functionality being enhanced by taking advantage of the EdgeX System Management Agent (SMA).

Technotects found the northbound connectivity to both Azure and AWS available in IOTech’s Edge Xpert to be very easy to configure. This highlights a key benefit of the EdgeX framework – decoupling investments in southbound data ingestion from any given cloud to enable choice over the long term, including realizing true-multitenancy from the edge. With the addition of support for multiple application services in the recent 1.0 Edinburgh release, data related to infrastructure monitoring and management can be sent to their management console of choice (in this case VMware’s Pulse IoT Center), whereas data related to the process for data analytics and taking action can be sent to any combination of on-prem or cloud-based application stacks of choice.

For local data persistence, Technotects chose RedisEdge over the MongoDB reference database that has been the baseline in the project until the recent 1.0 Edinburgh release. Technotects found it very easy to replace MongoDB with RedisEdge with no functionality differences, thanks to the work of Redis Labs in terms of making it an available plug-in within the EdgeX ecosystem. This is yet another example of how EdgeX is truly open and vendor-neutral, enabling users to leverage any enhancing functionality of their choice.

Finally, the PoC explored RSA Labs’ Project Iris active threat monitoring solution. Iris is a container that plugs into the EdgeX framework (and any other stack that supports containers) to profile baseline behavior for the stack and connected devices and then uses machine learning to detect anomalies. In turn Iris create alerts linked back to RSA’s popular Netwitness offering.

Conclusion

In closing, Technotects found EdgeX Foundry easy to work with and was able to successfully replicate their customer’s use case for process skid monitoring by leveraging the commercially supported framework from IOTech and value-add from Canonical, Dell, Redis, RSA and VMware. The flexibility to simply plug value-add into the open, vendor-neutral EdgeX foundation will provide both Technotects and their customers with more options in the future and help mitigate lock-in to proprietary edge platforms.

The EdgeX project has matured over the past two years to the current 1.0 state, and if you’re one of the thousands of end users that has been quietly prototyping with the platform, we welcome you to come forward and share your story on the project website through a blog or simple testimonial statement. The more people that come forward to share their success stories, the faster EdgeX will become the de-facto standard interoperability framework for the IoT Edge and the more we can all focus on innovation rather than reinvention!

Thank you for your time, and now’s your time to download the code or contact any of the providers in the ecosystem and build something great! Perhaps, as many have, even start your own business model around the EdgeX framework – just think of what Android did for scaling out an application and services ecosystem for mobile devices.

f you have questions or comments, visit the EdgeX Foundry Slack Channel and share your thoughts in the #community channel. Or, join the LF Edge Slack Channel and share your thoughts in the #EdgeX channel.

EdgeX Open Hackathon & Snaps

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry

Snaps are self-contained application packages designed to run on any system that supports them. Each snap is a compressed SquashFS package (bearing a .snap extension), containing all the assets required by an application to run independently, including binaries, libraries, icons, etc.

Snaps are managed by snap, the command-line userspace utility of the snapd service. With the snap command, users can query the Snap Store, install and refresh (update) snaps, remove snaps, and perform many other tasks such as managing application snapshots, setting command aliases, enabling or disabling services, etc.

The EdgeX Foundry project publishes a  snap named edgexfoundry, which includes all of the EdgeX core, export, security and support services, Mongo/Redis, and all of the 3rd party runtime dependencies (Consul, Vault, Kong, …). Hackathon participants should use the version from the latest/stable channel in the Snap Store, which is the 1.0.1 release (Edinburgh). See the snap’s README for details. To install from latest/stable run:

sudo snap install edgexfoundry

After installing the edgexfoundry snap view the services by issuing the snap services command.

sudo snap services edgexfoundry

Notice that after running this one simple snap install command, all of the services required to runEdgeX will have been installed and are already running in the background on your system. Note which services are enabled and which are active by running the snap services command.

Upon installation, the following EdgeX services are automatically enabled:

  • cassandra (persistent storage for Kong)
  • consul (aka ‘the registry’)
  • core-command
  • core-config-seed (one-shot)
  • core-data
  • core-metadata
  • edgexproxy (one-shot)
  • kong-daemon
  • mongod
  • mongo-worker (one-shot)
  • pkisetup (one-shot)
  • sys-mgmt-agent
  • vault
  • vault-worker (one-shot)

Note – some of the above services are “one-shot” services which run once and then exit. These will show up as “enabled” but “inactive”.

The following services are disabled by default:

  • support-notifications
  • support-logging
  • support-scheduler
  • export-client
  • export-distro
  • device-virtual
  • device-random

Any disabled service can be enabled and started using snap set. For example:

sudo snap set edgexfoundry support-notifications=on

To turn a service off (thereby disabling and immediately stopping it) set the service to off:

sudo snap set edgexfoundry support-notifications=off

On install, all services in a snap have corresponding systemd service units dynamically generated by snapd, thus if enabled, each will automatically start running when the system boots.

To keep things simple for EdgeX Open the security services in the edgexfoundry snap should be disabled by running:

sudo snap set edgexfoundry security-services=off

Currently, all log files for the snaps can be found inside $SNAP_COMMON, which is /var/snap/edgexfoundry/common. Additionally, logs can be viewed using the systemd journal or snap logs. To view the logs for all services in the edgexfoundry snap use:

sudo snap logs edgexfoundry

Individual service logs may be viewed by directly specifying the service name:

sudo snap logs edgexfoundry.consul

Once the EdgeX snap has been installed and the desired services have been successfully started, we are ready to set up an application service and a device service.

As a quick test the Mosquitto snap can be installed and a test topic can be published using the mosquitto_pub command. Use the following command to install Mosquitto:

sudo snap install mosquitto

Edgex-device-mqtt is a device service which supports importing device/sensor data readings via the MQTT protocol. It requires a running MQTT broker, as well as a peer MQTT application. The device service listens on a specific topic for incoming readings which it injects into EdgeX via the device service SDKs’ asynchronous readings feature. A peer MQTT application will be provided for the hackathon which will generate a steady stream of incoming readings related to the hackathon retail scenarios. This peer application will be setup to publish multiple scenario-specific streams on different topics. The device-mqtt service configuration provides a configuration value called “IncomingTopic” which can be used to change the topic the service listens on for incoming readings. Use the following command to install edgex-device-mqtt from the stable channel:

sudo snap install edgex-device-mqtt

After installation, check the status of the edgex-device-mqtt device service:

sudo snap services edgex-device-mqtt

Notice that the edgex-device-mqtt device service is disabled and inactive. This was done intentionally as the configuration and device profile need to be specific to each installation. You’ll find the configuration and device profile in the writable area of the snap (aka $SNAP_DATA):

/var/snap/edgex-device-mqtt/current/config/device-mqtt/res

After making the necessary modifications to configuration.toml (e.g. setting the “IncomingTopic” or changing “Port”) and mqtt.test.device.profile.yml (e.g. modifying device-resources, device-commmands, or core-commands), start and enable edgex-device-mqtt like this:

sudo snap start --enable edgex-device-mqtt

You should now be ready to receive peer MQTT application readings.

Now let’s publish a topic with a randfloat32 value of 1.2:

mosquitto_pub -t DataTopic -m '{"name":"MQTT test device","cmd":"randfloat32","randfloat32":"1.2"}'

You can check the readings from core-data with the following command:

curl -s localhost:48080/api/v1/reading | jq

Note – jq is a lightweight and flexible command-line JSON processor. In its simplest form with no command-line arguments specified, it simply outputs JSON its been given in a human-readable format. If not available on your system, it can be installed using sudo snap install jq.

If you see something similar to the following output then edgex-device-mqtt is working correctly. Float values are encoded base64 by default. The value “P5mZmg==” is 1.2 in base64.

[
   {
     "id": "4f922fd7-5c0d-48e0-8a06-6218d4c05fa9",
     "created": 1568926981304,
     "origin": 1568926981290,
     "modified": 1568926981304,
     "device": "MQTT test device",
     "name": "randfloat32",
     "value": "P5mZmg=="
   }
 ]

Once the device service has been started the configuration information is now in Consul. If you need to make further modifications to either the configuration or device profile, you’ll need to make the modifications in Consul which can be accessed from a browser at http://localhost:8500. After making modifications in Consul, the device service needs to be restarted like this:

sudo snap restart edgex-device-mqtt

If you would like to manage your EdgeX instance using a web browser, adding devices, device profiles, as well as visualizing data sent through the export service, you can do this through the EdgeX Web management UI. To install the edgex-ui-go snap run the following:

sudo snap install edgex-ui-go --channel=latest/beta

Now navigate with your browser to http://localhost:4000. The default user credentials are username: admin password:admin. Add your gateway and you’re ready to manage your EdgeX instance through the web UI.

Extending EdgeX

This section gives some hints as to how you can build your hackathon entry by creating or using additional EdgeX services.

App-Service-Configurable

Edgex-App-Service-Configurable – this is a new snap built from the current development release of EdgeX (Fuji). It allows a variety of use cases to be met by simply providing configuration (vs. writing code). For more information about this service, please refer to the README. As with device-mqtt, this service is disabled when first installed, as it requires configuration changes before it can be run. As with the device-mqtt snap, the configuration.toml file is found in the snap’s writable area:

/var/snap/edgex-app-service-configurable/current/config/res/

Profiles

In additional to base configuration.toml in this directory, there are a number of sub-directories that also contain configuration.toml files. These sub-directories are referred to as profiles. The service’s default behavior is to use the configuration.toml file from the /res directory. If you want to use one of the profiles, use the snap set command to instruct the service to read its configuration from one of these sub-directories. For example, to use the push-to-core profile you would run:

$ sudo snap set edgex-app-service-configurable profile=push-to-core

In addition to instructing the service to read a different configuration file, the profile will also be used to name the service when it registers itself to the system.

Note, as this service is based on the latest development release of EdgeX, not all use cases are supported, in particular integration with the EdgeX rules-engine will not work when used in conjunction with the Edinburgh release of EdgeX. Perform the following steps to install the edgex-app-service-configurable application service using the mqtt-export-configuration example and Mosquitto to test:

sudo snap install edgex-app-service-configurable

sudo snap set edgex-app-service-configurable profile=mqtt-export

sudo snap start --enable edgex-app-service-configurable.app-service-configurable

mosquitto_sub -t "edgex-events"

Multiple Instances

Multiple instances of edgex-app-service-configurable can be installed by using snap Parallel Installs. This is an experimental snap feature and must be first be enabled by running this command:

sudo snap set system experimental.parallel-instances=true

Now you can install multiple instances of the edgex-app-service-configurable snap by specifying a unique instance name when you install the snap. The instance name is made of the name of the snap plus a unique suffix which starts with the character “_”. This name only needs to be specified for the second and susbequent instances of the snap.

sudo snap install edgex-app-service-configurable edgex-app-service-configurable_http

or

sudo snap install edgex-app-service-configurable edgex-app-service-configurable_mqtt

Note – you must ensure that any configuration values that might cause conflict between the multiple instances (e.g. port, log file path, …) must be modified before enabling the snap’s service.

New Application or Device Services

Participants can also choose to construct their entry by building new device services (using the device SDKs) or new application services (using the application SDK). As the hackathon is time-boxed, most participants may just build new services natively vs. choosing to create Docker containers and/or snaps. For those interested in creating snaps for their new services, the following services can be useful as templates:

EdgeX Open: Training

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry

What is EdgeX Foundry?

The EdgeX Foundry is a Linux Foundation project with the goal of providing an open and extensible platform for IoT edge computing. As a platform, EdgeX doesn’t try to solve business problems directly, but rather to provide a solid base for such a solution to be built using off the shelf components, provided by the EdgeX Foundry project or 3rd parties, which all interoperate using the same open APIs.

EdgeX is built as a collection of microservices which communicate with each other over a set of standard, open REST APIs. This design gives it a few  distinct advantages over other approaches to edge computing. First, it allows you to run the microservices on different machines, or even on different parts of the network. For example, you can run device controlling services on the devices themselves, with the data collection and processing services on a computer with more storage and CPU capability. This design also means that individual components can be substituted with alternative implementations that fill a specific need, without having to replace or modify any of the other services. Finally, it allows you to add new services that bring in new capabilities. The most common types of services to add into EdgeX are custom Device and Application services.

How EdgeX fits into a smart edge solutions

Every IoT project needs to address the difficulties of connecting multiple, disparate devices together and to controlling software, often over slow or unreliable connections. As such, managing that communication, providing fault tolerance, security, and near-device compute capabilities are a functions any successful IoT project must provide. This common plumbing is precisely what EdgeX Foundry provides.

By using EdgeX components in your solution, you get a mature, tested, stable foundation on which you can build your own value-add products or services.

  • If you are building smart IoT devices, you can use EdgeX to connect to existing cloud offerings or datacenter software without having to build those connections into your device.
  • If you are developing analytics, automation or other kinds of business intelligence software, EdgeX lets you ingest data from devices that speak any number of protocols and use many different data models, without having to build those translations and transformations yourself.
  • If you provide custom deployments, EdgeX gives you an ecosystem of plug-and-play components that you can use to build up complex solutions quickly and reliably.

Running EdgeX in a development environment

You can build the EdgeX Foundry services using the open source code on Github, but more often than now you just need to get these services running so that you can connect your own services to them. To support that, the project publishes Docker images based on the latest stable release of the open source code, as well as docker-compose.yml files that will run all the necessary services together on your development machine.

  1. Install Docker and Docker Compose
  2. Download the latest stable docker-compose.yml file
  3. Run `docker-compose up -d`
  4. Verify that the services are all working with `docker-compose ps`
  5. Test the APIs with http://localhost:48080/api/v1/ping

Once you have the EdgeX services running, you can take our Quick Start guide, or more in-depth API Walkthrough to get a feel for how EdgeX services work together.

Extending EdgeX to hardware with Device Services

In order to connect new devices to your EdgeX instance you will need to use a Device Service. These specialized services are responsible for communicating to devices over their own protocol, sending data from them into the EdgeX core-data service, and taking commands from the EdgeX core-command service and using them to control the device.

The EdgeX Foundry provides reference device services for a number of common IoT and smart device protocols, including MQTTModbus and plain HTTP, and you can use those pre-written services if your device supports those protocols. But if you need something more, the EdgeX Foundry Device SDKs make it easy for you to build a new device service capable of supporting your device.

Using either the Go or C SDKs, you can bootstrap a new Device Service that will already handle all of the setup and configuration for your new service, including uploading your Device Profiles into EdgeX core-metadata, provisioning any devices you have pre-defined, and scheduling automatic readings from your devices. The SDK also provides functions for calling all the common EdgeX APIs in a language-friendly way. All you have to do is add your device-specific connection and control code.

Training Tip: You can do end-to-end testing of your new Device Service by connecting your local EdgeX deployment up to a cloud service or NodeRed instance, and watch the readings flow in and commands go out.

Extending EdgeX to the cloud with Application Services

Since EdgeX Foundry itself doesn’t try to do anything other than efficiently moving data off the edge, you’re eventually going to want to send that data to some software for further processing. To do that, EdgeX provides a couple of ways to publish data to software running either on the edge, in a data center, or the cloud.

The first method is to use the pre-built Export Services, which are capable of sending data as JSON or XML over simple HTTP or MQTT to another service. This is a good option if you are using a service that already knows how to handle these common protocols, and can do any data transformations you need.

But if those aren’t suitable, the EdgeX Foundry also provides an Application Functions SDK for writing custom handlers, which can do anything from publishing data to a remote host, to performing local transformations, analytics and responses right from the edge. The SDK allows you to trigger you application functions whenever data comes into EdgeX, or on-demand, and even provides functions for publishing your data (via HTTP or MQTT) when you’re done handling it locally. Application Functions can even be chained together to build complex pipelines, reusing the same Application Functions in different ways.

Training Tip: You can do end-to-end testing of your new Application Service by connecting the Virtual Device Service to your local EdgeX deployment, which can simulate device data coming in.

EdgeX Foundry Contributors and Users Share Thoughts on the Edinburgh Release, the Growing Ecosystem and more!

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry

Last month, EdgeX Foundry released its production ready Edinburgh release, which provides an open platform for IoT edge computing to a growing global ecosystem for a range of vertical markets including enterprise, industrial, retail and consumer. The fourth release in the EdgeX roadmap, the EdgeX Edinburgh release supports complementary products and services such as commercial support, training and customer pilot programs created by LF Edge members and contributors.

Now that EdgeX is “ready for primetime,” learn more about what contributors and users of the EdgeX Foundry platform had to say about the new release.

According to AWS, AWS, Dell Technologies, and the open-source EdgeX Foundry have collaborated to create IoT edge interoperability and simplify integration across inherently heterogeneous solution stacks. AWS customers can now seamlessly deploy AWS IoT Greengrass to the IoT edge within the EdgeX framework. The EdgeX framework enables data ingestion across connected devices and data sources for AWS IoT Greengrass and AWS IoT Core. This is further enhanced with plug-in value-add from the growing EdgeX and LF Edge ecosystems.

“AMD processors deliver the performance, advanced security features, and scalability to support the most demanding edge computing requirements, while providing breakthrough processing agility for x86-based IoT infrastructure. As a founding member of EdgeX Foundry, AMD continues to support a powerful and open ecosystem for interoperable IoT and edge compute solutions, that leverage the robust, scalable and open EdgeX framework.” – said Amey Deosthali, Director of Embedded Channel Applications, AMD

“HP joined the LF Edge project to help facilitate collaboration among industry-leading vendors and partners to solve common business problems. We are happy to see the Edinburgh production release by EdgeX Foundry to help support that objective. This release delivers commercial viability with increased stability and connectivity across a wide range of standards to reduce costs, complexity, and time to deploy. We look forward to seeing innovations at the edge that accelerate deployment of comprehensive retail use cases.” – Aaron Weiss, Vice President and General Manager, Retail Solutions, HP Inc.

“With the EdgeX Foundry Edinburgh Release, industrial IoT companies can easily integrate Mocana’s TrustCenter™ and TrustPoint™ cyber protection software solution to ensure the safety and reliability of industrial gateways and controllers. Mocana’s FIPS 140-2 validated device security software and security management platform enable companies to build and operate tamper-resistant products that protect the device, data, applications and communications. EdgeX and Mocana together help manufacturers and operators to accelerate compliance, ensure privacy, and protect the most complex industrial systems that run microservices, containerized applications, and hardware-based secure elements, such as the Trusted Platform Module (TPM).” – Keao Caindec, Head of Cyber Protection & Privacy, Mocana

“The production-ready EdgeX Foundry Edinburgh release provides important new capabilities for edge computing nodes.  The availability of an open, vendor-neutral source framework for connecting IoT devices to applications and cloud computing facilities is critical to the success of IoT and Edge processing efforts across multiple industries.” – Sam Fuller, Director of Strategy, NXP Semiconductors

EdgeX Foundry Hackathon

The EdgeX Foundry community is planning a series of hackathons focused on addressing real-world use cases with solutions built from commercial content from sponsors unified by the EdgeX framework.

The inaugural EdgeX hackathon will be hosted at Tech Nexus in Chicago on October 7 and 8. The event will focus on the retail market and work stemmed from the Commerce (e.g. Retail) Working Group within the EdgeX Foundry project and the related Open Retail Initiative (ORI).

Participating developers (from students to retail end users) will use their talents and creativity combined with the EdgeX framework, commercial content from sponsoring companies and the rules of the event to develop a solution for either one of the specified customer-valued retail use-cases or an additional open category.

Details about the competition, link to register and more will be available in the next few weeks. Stay tuned here for more.

Other supportive quotes:

“EdgeX Foundry is the key component of Beechwoods IoT gateway solution that allows our customers to engage confidently in edge computing technology. With the Edinburgh release, this solution will be ready to transition from customer engagement to product deployment.” – Brad Kemp, President, Beechwoods Software

“The Edinburgh release of EdgeX Foundry brings much needed standardization and stability for edge computing in production environments through an open source, common framework. The availability of the EdgeX Foundry snap enables developers an easy path to getting started with EdgeX Foundry, and benefit from confinement, easy integration into their own infrastructure, and automatic updates. In addition, this release introduces new device snaps providing integration with MQTT and ModBus.”- Loic Minier, IoT Field Engineering Director, Canonical

“As EdgeX Foundry reaches maturity with the Edinburgh release, CloudPlugs is excited to also announce the integration of the CloudPlugs IIoT platform with the open EdgeX ecosystem.  CloudPlugs IoT is a robust backend to deploy, orchestrate and manage EdgeX-compliant devices and micro service-based applications, as well as to manage and visualize field data. The EdgeX framework provides new levels of flexibility in field-level interoperability and the combination of EdgeX with CloudPlugs IoT delivers a powerful, end-to-end software and service stack to digitize assets and to deploy commercial and industrial IoT solutions at scale.” – Jimmy Garcia-Meza, CEO, CloudPLugs Inc. 

“Having started the EdgeX movement with a small team at Dell before contributing the code to the Linux Foundation, it’s certainly amazing to see the traction we’ve gotten through open, vendor neutral collaboration in a few short years. It’s a testament to the power of the network effect in the open source community which ultimately enables developers to focus on value rather than reinvention.” – Jason Shepherd, former chair of the EdgeX Foundry Governing Board and IoT and Edge CTO, Dell Technologies

“EdgeX Foundry provides an important software platform standardizing on the south bound IoT device connectivity and northbound data storage connectivity and allows vendors to plug in their core IoT capabilities in between. FogHorn is aligned with this data ingestion and publication standardization and will continue to collaborate as appropriate.” – Sastry Malladi, CTO, FogHorn

“The EdgeX platform offers HMS Networks a path to quickly build Industrial IoT solutions by providing predefined set of services for I/O functionality. HMS has created a J1939 service for EdgeX platform to help simplify IoT solutions for the commercial vehicle telemetry market. Ultimately, the EdgeX platform will significantly reduce the R&D investment required to create a majority of the Industrial IoT applications required in the market today.” – Tom McKinney, Director Engineering Services and Business Development, HMS Networks

“EdgeX Foundry is an important project arriving at the right time. It promises to connect devices to capabilities, and then get out of the way so you can run containerized workloads to generate insights, run model scoring, or detect anomalies… all at the edge. IBM is collaborating with EdgeX Foundry as part of our hybrid cloud strategy to help enterprises unlock the value of data from on-premises to the cloud to the edge.” – David Boloker, Distinguished Engineer, IBM

“EdgeX Foundry’s open source platform enables the industrial software ecosystem to integrate rapidly with ioTium’s managed services converged infrastructure offering – it’s microservices framework with open APIs is a powerful driver in the fragmented Industrial Control Systems market. ioTium enables rapid scalable deployment of the EdgeX Foundry framework globally.”- Ron Victor, CEO, ioTium 

“EdgeX Foundry provides an open framework for ease of design, development, & deployment at the Edge, while addressing stringent security,  privacy & compliance requirements. NetFoundry added its vendor-agnostic, connectivity-as-code solution to  EdgeX in order to enable developers and integrators to get similar ease of use, security and performance for their northbound application connectivity to core, clouds and service meshes. With the release of the EdgeX Edinburgh release, the EdgeX Foundry developer community has all the tools needed to deliver on market needs and ensure secure, agile innovation at the Edge” – Galeal Zino, CEO, NetFoundry Inc.

“As Digital Transformation for IoT gathers momentum, companies are demanding the same reliability, performance and security at the edge as they are used to getting from their Cloud Computing stack. With this release, EdgeX with Redis Labs RedisEdge not only delivers upon those expectations, but provides an ecosystem of open source technologies and plug-ins such as Redis Modules that help developers innovate.” – Dave Nielsen, Head of Community and Ecosystem Programs, Redis Labs

“EdgeX Foundry addresses the problem of the license stack at the IoT Edge constantly increasing in cost by providing a well architected, high performance, open source platform that can be used for industrial solutions today.” Mike Malone, Vice President, Technotects, Inc.

“EdgeX Foundry’s global community ecosystem has experienced explosive growth, and the tangible advances delivered in the EdgeX  Edinburgh release are exciting developments for edge computing. We fully support EdgeX Foundry’s goals to establish an open interoperable framework for edge computing to provide developers with increased control over how, when, where and with whom they run their applications and manage their data. We look forward to continuing our contributions to the EdgeX Foundry community and related efforts in fostering open industry-wide innovation such as the Open Retail initiative.” – Mimi Spier, Vice President, Edge and IoT Business, VMware

“As a founding member of LF Edge, Wipro is proud to have contributed to the Edinburgh release. We will continue to actively participate as it is a key platform for delivering open, microservices-based, edge IoT applications for today’s interoperable distributed enterprise world.” – Andrew Aitken, general manager and global open source practice leader, Wipro Limited.

“ZEDEDA’s vision is to free cloud-native and legacy apps to run on any edge device anywhere in the world. This vision drives our support for EdgeX Foundry and its mission of promoting open interoperability between edge devices. We’ve made our virtualization solutions compatible with EdgeX releases because we believe they will have a central role in our industry’s future.” – Joel Vincent, VP Marketing, ZEDEDA

To learn more about the EdgeX Foundry Edinburgh release:

Building Automation: A Sweet Spot for EdgeX Foundry

By | Blog, EdgeX Foundry

Written by Andy Foster, active member of the EdgeX Foundry technical community and Product Director at IOTech

The key objective for LF Edge’s EdgeX Foundry is to create a flexible and open edge computing IoT platform that can support a range of different vertical use cases across markets such as manufacturing, oil & gas and smart energy. A key vertical market that has emerged for the community and IOTech, in particular, has been involved in multiple projects is Building Automation.

Why is Building Automation proving to be such a sweet spot for EdgeX? In our experience, the requirements of the next generation of Building Automation applications align perfectly with the capabilities of EdgeX.  In particular, a modern building is a sophisticated and heterogeneous environment consisting of diverse subsystems including lighting, HVAC and access control. Data can be generated from multiple sources using a range of different device/sensor technologies and protocols (e.g. Modbus, BACnet, DALI, MQTT and others).

The sensor data must be normalized by the IoT platform running on an Edge node e.g. an industrial Gateway or on-premise server. The data can then be fed into the building management analytics which can make smart control decisions in “near” real-time on how to automatically optimize the building environment for the benefit of the users and also the building owners.  As an open source project, EdgeX Foundry (can support any “Southbound” OT protocol or “Northbound” Cloud endpoint) and its platform independence (not tied to a specific operating system or hardware/silicon) is key to its suitability for Building Automation use cases. Most importantly, EdgeX also provides “out-of-the-box” connectivity for a number of the protocols most commonly required in a smart building system. As of the most recent EdgeX Edinburgh release the list includes Modbus, BACNet, MQTT and OPC UA Device Services.

The below video showcases the demo created by IOTech on behalf of the Linux Foundation to highlight the key capabilities that make EdgeX a great choice of Edge IoT Platform for use in Building Automation applications. It shows the integration of multiple devices commonly found in commercial buildings (light and temperature sensors, HVAC controller, DALI lighting controllers, power meter and access control system). Based on occupancy data, the Edge Analytics automatically regulates the building environment, controlling the light levels and HVAC settings in multiple independent zones based on the ambient light and temperature readings from each zone. Overall power consumption of the building is also monitored and key data streams are exported to a Big Data application running on AWS Cloud.

For more information about EdgeX Foundry, visit the website here. To learn more about the other edge computing projects under the LF Edge umbrella, visit the website here.

IoT World Today: Now a Part of LF Edge, EdgeX Foundry Gains Momentum

By | Akraino, Akraino Edge Stack, EdgeX Foundry, In the News

When grappling with the enormity of IoT platforms, a sort of herd mentality has emerged, leading scores of vendors to create unique IoT platforms. But the problem is, no single IoT platform can accommodate all potential enterprise and industrial IoT use cases, according to Jason Shepherd, former chair of the EdgeX Foundry governing board. So organizations can become overwhelmed by the complexity of platform integration on the one hand or creating a platform from scratch on the other, Shepherd said. “I liken it to a riptide current. Your natural inclination is to swim into the current, but you risk drowning if you do that,” added Shepherd, who is the IoT and edge chief technology officer at Dell Technologies. “What you’re supposed to do, which is not intuitive, is to swim sideways.”

The EdgeX Foundry was created to sidestep the IoT platform battles. “While most people were trying to create their own platforms, we went open,” Shepherd said. “We swam sideways. And that’s what’s actually going to win.”

The EdgeX Foundry recently announced growing momentum with its latest release, known as “Edinburgh.” The product of a global ecosystem, Edinburgh is the latest example of the EdgeX Foundry’s open source microservices framework. The approach enables users to plug and play components from a growing number of third-party offerings.

In other LF Edge–related news, LF Edge’s Akraino Edge Stack initiative launched its first release in June to establish a framework for the 5G and IoT edge application ecosystem. Known as Akraino R1, it brings together several edge disciplines and offers deployment-ready blueprints.

Kandan Kathirvel, a director at AT&T and Akraino technical steering committee chair, invokes the early days of cloud computing to explain the mission behind the initiative. “In cloud computing, one of the pain points many users had when deploying the cloud was integrating multiple open source projects together,” Kathirvel said. “A user might need to work with hundreds of different open source communities.” And after deploying a cloud project, sometimes gaps were evident. Many organizations found themselves individually in this situation without realizing other users were essentially doing the same. “And this situation increases the cost and deployment time.”

Read more about EdgeX Foundry’s Edinburgh release and Akraino Edge Stack’s R1 release in this IoT World Today article here.

The Manufacturing Connection: Open Source IoT Project Reaching Maturity

By | EdgeX Foundry, In the News

It is great to see things mature–whether kids or adults or technologies. Or an open source project called EdgeX Foundry. Yesterday I had the pleasure of two exciting teleconferences regarding the latest release of EdgeX Foundry, named Edinburgh, from the Linux Foundation’s LF Edge organization. I’ve had many conversations with Jason Shepherd, LF Edge Board Member and Dell Technologies IoT and Edge Computing CTO, over the past three years. When we finally got a chance to catch up yesterday afternoon, he could not have concealed his excitement had he tried.

I have written about EdgeXFoundry here from Hannover 2017again in 2018, and when incorporated in Linux Foundation’s LF Edge umbrella. This IoT platform is more than a platform. During my Hannover visits of 2017 and 2018 it seemed that all God’s children need to develop their own IoT platform. Of course, when a company develops a platform the goal is to connect as many apps as possible to its main application.

Read more of Gary’s article in the Manufacturing Connection.